The Covid-19 pandemic sparked a significant rise in gender-based violence and domestic abuse across Scotland (and the rest of the world), due to restrictions on movement and an increase in social isolation. As research from RGU put it, “Covid-19 gave perpetrators more tools for control.” In response, increased funding was made available for domestic abuse charities – though many still struggle to meet demand and cope with negative impacts on staff and volunteer wellbeing. There has also been an increase in public awareness campaigns about domestic abuse and coercive control, with posters and information about local support at pharmacies, supermarkets, and even some vaccination centres. However, it is likely that many ethnic minority women are excluded from accessing support due to language issues, cultural differences and other barriers. Aberdeen Violence Against Women Partnership has produced postcards with contact information for domestic abuse support services, including helplines in other languages.

Research conducted by ACVO in 2020 stated that service provision in Aberdeen addressing domestic abuse did not cater for the intersectional needs of people with disabilities, those from ethnic minority communities, LGBTQ+ communities, men and perpetrators.

Domestic abuse support services postcard available here: Link.